Indmedica - India's Premier Medical Portal - Cyber Lectures

 

Message Prediction of Preeclampsia. How good is the estimation of levels of calcium, magnesium and lactic dehydrogenase as biochemical markers?

Dr Geeta B K

Page 1

Topics

Objective: This study was undertaken to develop a predictive markers for preeclampsia using serum levels of calcium, magnesium, and lactic dehydrogenase as biochemical markers and to predict the severity of pre eclampsia.

Study design: This was a prospective case control study conducted during 2000 to 2002 in a tertiary care maternity unit. Total of one hundred and forty seven women with mild (121) and severe (26) preeclampsia were studied and control arm comprised one hundred and forty seven normal pregnant women. Case patients with severe preeclampsia were compared with control subjects with respect to clinical data and multiple-marker screening test results.

Results: Serum levels of ionised calcium, magnesium were reduced in preeclampsia and high levels of lactic dehydrogenase (> 600 IU) closely correlated with severity of pre eclampsia. These markers were measured after the clinical diagnosis of pre eclampsia and gestational hypertension. The mean ᄆSD for each group was calculated and the difference between the means of the normotensive and the other groups were compared by analysis of variance. Significant differences from normal to the preeclamptic pregnancies were in lower ionised calcium (pd0.001), and lower serum magnesium (pd0.0001) in preeclamptic women compared to normal controls. Pearson’s rank correlation between blood pressure and severity of pre eclampsia showed a direct relation to high levels of serum lactic dehydrogenase level (pd0.01)

Conclusion: Gestational profiles of calcium, magnesium and lactic dehydrogenase were abnormal in the group with preeclampsia, and these markers may prove useful in the selective prediction of preeclampsia and its severity.

References:

  1. Can antenatal clinical and biochemical markers predict the development of severe preeclampsia? American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 182(3):589-594, March 2000.Stamilio, David M. MD a,b; Sehdev, Harish M. MD c; Morgan, Mark A. MD a; Propert, Kathleen ScD b; Macones, George A. MD, MSCE a,b
  2. Blood cell lead, calcium, and magnesium levels associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia. Earl B. Dawson1 , Douglas R. Evans1, Randall Kelly1 and James W. Van Hook1. Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 77555 Galveston, TX Am J OG
  3. Serum ionized magnesium levels in normal and preeclamptic g Obstetrics & Gynecology 1997;89:24-27 ᄅ 1997 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists estation CA Standley, JE Whitty, BA Mason, and DB Cotton.
  4. Comparison of serum copper, zinc, calcium, and magnesium levels in preeclamptic and healthy pregnant women. Selahattin Kumru1 , Suleyman Aydin2, Mehmet Simsek1, Kazim Sahin3, Mehmet Yaman4 and Gul Ay1
  5. A longitudinal study of biochemical variables in women at risk of preeclampsia. LC Chappell, PT Seed, A Briley, FJ Kelly, BJ Hunt, DS Charnock-Jones, AI Mallet, L Poston, Maternal and Fetal Research Unit, Department Cardiovascular Research, Guy’s King’s and St Thomas’ School of Medicine, King’s College, London, UK.Am J Obstet Gynecol (2002) 187: 127-36.
  6. Lactic dehydrogenase as a biochemical marker of adverse pregnancy outcome in severe pre-eclampsia.Qublan HS, Ammarin V, Bataineh O, Al-Shraideh Z, Tahat Y, Awamleh I, Khreisat B, Nussair B, Amarin ZO. 1: Med Sci Monit. 2005 Aug;11(8):CR393-7.
  7. Screening test for preeclampsia through assessment of uteroplacental blood flow and biochemical markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction , Mauro Parra MDa, Ram￳n Rodrigo MScb, Pilar Barjab, Cleofina Boscob, Virginia Fern£ndez PhDb, Hern£n Mu￱oz MDa and Emiliano Soto-Chac￳n MDa . American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Volume 193, Issue 4, October 2005, Pages 1486-1491

  8. Geeta Krishnamurthy B. MRCOG, Asma Baluchi ( Lab Staff ) Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman. Contact: gee_venk(at)yahoo.com

Back